ODWS icon

The Open Door Web Site
HOMEPAGE CHEMISTRY PHYSICS ELECTRONICS BIOLOGY HISTORY OF SCI & TECH MATH STUDIES LEARNING FRENCH STUDY GUIDE  PHOTO GALLERY
HISTORY HOMEPAGE TOPIC CHAPTERS LIVING HISTORY PROJECT EVENTS LESSON NOTES TIPS ON STUDYING HISTORY GLOSSARY OF TERMS

WS

The Biography Index

Biographies Main Index

 

Edward VI (1547-1553)

The Church was much reformed during his reign under the guidance of Lord Somerset and later the Duke of Northumberland.

Mary I (1553-1558)

Mary gained the nickname "Bloody Mary" after she burnt so many Protestants at the stake in an attempt to reinstate the Catholic religion in England.

Portrait of Mary I

Portrait of Mary I by Antonius Mor c. 1554

 

BIOGRAPHIES

Custom Search

The Anglican Church

English Protestantism differs essentially from other forms of Protestant religions because it developed in the opposite way. Whereas Luther and Calvin advocated religions which caused them to separate from the Catholic Church, England separated from the Catholic Church first and then brought about changes.

Although Henry VIII had taken the title of Head of the Church of England and had been excommunicated, he was essentially still a Catholic and so were most of his subjects. Protestant ideas filtered into the new Church of England during Henry's reign and Henry himself had agreed to certain changes on Protestant lines.

After Henry died it was relatively easy to change the status quo during the reign of his son, Edward VI. Edward was young, ill and manageable. In the six years he was on the throne English was substituted for Latin during church services, the mass was abandoned and a common prayer book was introduced.

Being separated from Rome had brought many benefits, mostly financial. A good deal of ex-Church land had become available, as well as the money which would have gone to Rome. It was hardly surprising, therefore, that only the most devout Catholics were pleased when Queen Mary I declared Catholicism the state religion in 1553. It also explains why, after her death in 1558, most people heaved sighs of relief and England readily returned to the Anglican Church.

Henry VIII's sixth (and last) wife, Catherine Parr, was known to have read Protestant literature which Henry had banned from circulation. On Henry's death Catherine Parr became the guardian of the Princess Elizabeth. This explains why Elizabeth was "more Protestant than Catholic" in outlook. When Elizabeth came to the throne after Mary's death, she deliberately tried to make the Church of England acceptable to both Protestants and Catholics. The Anglican Church, therefore, finished up as a hybrid, showing, perhaps, more Protestant characteristics. Of course there were always extremists to be dealt with, and throughout her reign Elizabeth was plagued by Catholic plots against her and an increasing number of Puritans (Calvinists) in Parliament.

 

The Open Door Web Site is non-profit making. Your donations help towards the cost of maintaining this free service on-line.

Donate to the Open Door Web Site using PayPal

SITE MAP
WHAT'S NEW?
ABOUT

PRIVACY

COPYRIGHT

SPONSORSHIP

DONATIONS

ADVERTISING

The Open Door Team 2017
Any questions or problems regarding this site should be addressed to the webmaster

© Shirley Burchill 2017

Footnote : As far as the Open Door team can ascertain the images shown on this page are in the Public Domain.

Hosted By
Web Hosting by HostCentric


SiteLock