ODWS icon

The Open Door Web Site
HOMEPAGE BIOLOGY PHYSICS ELECTRONICS HISTORY HISTORY OF SCI & TECH MATH STUDIES LEARNING FRENCH STUDY GUIDE  PHOTO GALLERY
CHEMISTRY HOMEPAGE TOPIC CHAPTERS PHYSICAL SCIENCE LABORATORY WORK 

 

 

 

Navigation

Next (in period)
Previous (in period)
Above (in group)
Below (in group)
Visual Chemistry Homepage : The Periodic Table

 

Tutorials

Atomic Structure
Electrovalent Bonding
Covalent Bonding
Water
Transition Metals
Metal or Non-metal?
Noble Gases

 

General

Element Identification Timeline

VISUAL CHEMISTRY

Custom Search

Arsenic

What the name means: The origin or the name arsenic is probably from the Greek word arsenikos, meaning strong, brave or male. This is because, since prehistoric times around 2000BC, arsenic compounds had been added to metals, such as copper, to make the metal stronger. Another interpretation is that the origin is from the Greek word arsenikon, meaning coloured yellow. One of the three types of arsenic usually found in tin, silver and gold mines is yellow.

Arsenic

Arsenic atom

Arsenic atom

 

 

Arsenic III cation

Arsenic V cation

Arsenic III cation

Arsenic V cation

 

 

 

Arsenic III ion

 

Arsenic ion

Who identified arsenic?: Arsenic compounds, the sulphides and the oxide, come in yellow, red and white forms and have been used since prehistoric times. The Greek philosopher, Aristotle, made reference to arsenic compounds in his writings. The metal was probably first isolated from yellow arsenic by an alchemist called Albertus Magnus around 1250. He claimed to have produced a metal after heating yellow arsenic with soap. In 1649 a chemist called Johann Schröder extracted the metal by heating white arsenic with carbon. It was not until Antoine Lavoisier published his Elementary Treatise of Chemistry in 1789 that arsenic was recognised as an element.

 

Properties

ASPROPS

STP = standard temperature and pressure.
Usually considered as room temperature and pressure.

 

About arsenic: Although arsenic is well known as a poison, since the 18th century it was a medicine, in small doses, to treat certain bacterial diseases. It was in use until the discovery and development of antibiotics. The human body contains trace amounts of arsenic and certain foods, notably prawns, contain more concentrated amounts. Arsenic compounds are found associated with tin, silver and gold deposits. To stop them becoming ill from the ingestion of arsenic compounds, Cornish miners developed a safe way to eat their lunch underground. The Cornish pasty had a pastry rim that a miner would hold while he ate the main part of the pasty. The pastry rim or crust was then thrown away so that the miner would not transfer any arsenic on his hands to the food he was eating.

 

The Open Door Web Site is non-profit making. Your donations help towards the cost of maintaining this free service on-line.

Donate to the Open Door Web Site using PayPal

SITE MAP
WHAT'S NEW?
ABOUT

PRIVACY

COPYRIGHT

SPONSORSHIP

DONATIONS

ADVERTISING

© The Open Door Team 2017
Any questions or problems regarding this site should be addressed to the webmaster

© Shirley Burchill 2017

Hosted By
Web Hosting by HostCentric


SiteLock