ODWS icon

The Open Door Web Site
HOMEPAGE CHEMISTRY PHYSICS ELECTRONICS HISTORY HISTORY OF SCI & TECH MATH STUDIES LEARNING FRENCH STUDY GUIDE  PHOTO GALLERY
BIOLOGY HOMEPAGE  IB BIOLOGY WEB TOPIC CHAPTERS FACTS & FIGURES LABORATORY WORK QUESTIONS & QUIZZES ECOLOGY CLUB PLAYS

 

Part XX: How Organisms Communicate

The Effect of Stimuli on the Behaviour of an organism
The Effect of Chemical Stimuli
The Effect of Sound Stimuli
The Effect of Light Stimuli
The Effect of the Touch on Stimulus
The Effect of Stimuli on Behaviour Summary
(useful for revision)

The Effect of Stimuli on Behaviour : Questions

Chemical Emitters and Receptors
Sound Emitters and Receptors
Light Emitters and Receptors
Emitters and Receptors Summary (useful for revision)
Emitters and Receptors : Questions

Communication inside the Organism
The Vertebrate Central Nervous System

Topic Chapters Index

 

Jellyfish, Bristol Zoo, UK © Shirley Burchill

The tentacles of jellyfish are organs of touch

 

Fish showing the lateral line, Aquarium, Paris © Shirley Burchill

The lateral line is able to sense differences in the
pressure of water around the fish

TOUCH : THE RECEPTOR ORGANS

Custom Search

The bodies of all animals, from one-celled organisms to humans, have touch receptor cells all over their surfaces. Any particularly sensitive area is often called an organ of touch, such as the human hand, the mole's nose and the tentacles of the jellyfish. When necessary, touch can be used to substitute for sight. Blind people, for example, 'read' using their sense of touch when they use Braille.

Fish have a special organ along each side of their bodies called the lateral line. The lateral line is able to sense differences in the pressure of water around the fish. This organ helps carnivorous fish to locate their prey and also helps fish detect predators and find sexual partners. It is thought that the lateral line system is responsible for keeping shoals of fish together as they move swiftly through the water.

 

Drawing of a sting ray © Shirley Burchill

 

A few fish have a specialized lateral line system with electrically sensitive organs. These organs are found deep in the body, often in the head of the fish. Sharks, rays and catfish use these organs to detect the weak electric charges produced by their prey. Freshwater eels, however, use the same organ to find and stun their prey.

 

An electric eel, Marine Aquarium, Plymouth, UK © Shirley Burchill

Eels use electric shocks to stun their prey

 

The organ acts as an emitter by producing frequent weak electric shocks (300 per second) into the water. These eels can sense whether the electric field is deformed by the presence of another animal. When another animal is detected, the organ acts as a receiver and the eel produces an electric current strong enough to stun its prey.

 

The Open Door Web Site is non-profit making. Your donations help towards the cost of maintaining this free service on-line.

Donate to the Open Door Web Site using PayPal

SITE MAP
WHAT'S NEW?
ABOUT

PRIVACY

COPYRIGHT

SPONSORSHIP

DONATIONS

ADVERTISING

© The Open Door Team 2017
Any questions or problems regarding this site should be addressed to the webmaster

© Paul Billiet, Shirley Burchill, Alan Damon and Deborah James 2017

Hosted By
Web Hosting by HostCentric


SiteLock